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Demystify your dog's appearance with 35+ trait tests.

Albino

The Albino variant tested causes a complete inability to produce pigment (albinism). The variant is located in the SLC45A2 gene.

Back Muscle and Bulk

The Back Muscle and Bulk variant is associated with increased back muscle and fat. The variant is located in the ACSL4 gene.

Blue Eyes

The Blue Eyes variant is associated with blue eyes and heterochromia, which is when the eyes are two different colors, and is located in the ALX4 gene.

Chocolate (Variant 1)

Chocolate (Variant 1), also known as bc, causes all dark hair, eye rims, nose and paw pads on the dog to be brown or chocolate instead of black. This variant is found in the TYRP1 gene (known as the B locus).

Chocolate (Variant 2)

Chocolate (Variant 2), also known as bs, causes all dark hair, eye rims, nose and paw pads on the dog to be brown or chocolate instead of black. This variant is found in the TYRP1 gene (known as the B locus).

Curly Coat

The Curly Coat variant causes a curly coat type and is located in the KRT71 gene.

Dominant Black

The Dominant Black variant is responsible for black and brindle coat colors. The Dominant Black variant is also known as KB (or Kbr if brindle), and is found in the CBD103 gene (known as the K locus).

Fawn

The Fawn variant is one of the most common red coat patterns, and is responsible for a coat with a red base, and dark-tipped hairs, often darkest over the forehead, ears, spine and tail. Fawn (also denoted as "ay") is found in the ASIP gene (known as the A locus).

Floppy Ears

The Floppy Ears variant is associated with ears that fold due to decreased cartilage stiffness. The variant is located in the MSRB3 gene.

Furnishings

The Furnishings variant causes a fuzzy beard, moustache and eyebrows, and is located in the RSPO2 gene.

Hair Ridge

The Hair Ridge variant causes an unusual permanent ridge of hair which will run down the dog's spine. The Hair Ridge variant is a duplication of the FGF3, FGF4, FGF19 and ORAOV1 genes.

Hairlessness (Discovered in the American Hairless Terrier)

The Hairlessness (Discovered in the American Hairless Terrier) variant causes dogs to have little or no hair, and is located in the SGK3 gene.

Hairlessness (Discovered in the Chinese Crested Dog) Linkage test

The Hairlessness (Discovered in the Chinese Crested Dog) variant causes dogs to have little or no hair, and is located in the FOXI3 gene.

Hairlessness (Discovered in the Scottish Deerhound)

The Hairlessness (Discovered in the Scottish Deerhound) variant causes a dog to have little or no hair, and is located in the SGK3 gene.

Harlequin

The Harlequin variant results in a distinctive pattern of spots of color on a white coat background, but only when the merle variant is also present. The Harlequin variant is found in the PSMB7 gene (known as the H locus).

High Altitude Adaptation

The High Altitude Adaptation variant is associated with an adaptation to living at high altitudes. The variant is located in the EPAS1 gene.

Hind Dewclaws (Discovered in Asian breeds)

The Hind Dewclaws (Discovered in Asian breeds) variant may result in the presence of hind dewclaws, which actually have no function! The variant is also known as DC-1, and is located in the LMBR1 gene.

Hind Dewclaws (Discovered in Western breeds)

The Hind Dewclaws (Discovered in Western breeds) variant may result in the presence of hind dewclaws, which actually have no function! The variant is also known as DC-2, and is located in the LMBR1 gene.

Long Hair (Variant 1)

The Long Hair variant causes long hair in dogs and is located in the FGF5 gene.

Mask

The Mask variant causes dark facial hair, mainly over the dog's muzzle, which looks a bit like a mask. The Mask variant is also known as Em and is found in the MC1R gene (known as the E locus).

Merle

The Merle variant causes a patchy coat pattern common in many herding breeds. Each dog's pattern is unique. On a black dog, areas of black and silver will be seen, or on a chocolate dog, areas of brown and beige. It can occur in combination with many other coat patterns, and can cause blue eyes or a fully or partly pink nose. The Merle variant is found in the PMEL gene (known as the M locus).

Piebald

The Piebald variant causes white spotting, patches and/ or a completely white coat. It can also cause blue eyes, pink or "butterfly" nose, pink eye rims, white toenails and pink paw pads. The Piebald variant, also known as "sp" (for spotting), is found in the MITF gene (known as the S locus).

Recessive Black

The Recessive Black variant is a rare cause of black coat color. The Recessive Black variant, also known as the "a" variant, is found in the ASIP gene (known as the A locus).

Recessive Red (Variant 1)

The Recessive Red variant causes only shades of red (phaeomelanin) pigment to be displayed in a dog’s coat, ranging from a deep red, to orange, yellow or even white. The variant is also known as the e variant and is found in the MC1R gene (known as the E locus).

Reduced Shedding

The Reduced Shedding variant is associated with a decreased tendency for a dog to shed hair. The variant is located in the MC5R gene.

Saddle Tan

The Saddle Tan variant is responsible for a red color pattern with a dark-haired saddle over the back. The variant is located in the RALY gene.

Short Legs

The Short Legs variant is associated with short legs due to chondrodysplasia. The variant is an insertion of an FGF4 gene on chromosome 18.

Short Snout (Variant 1)

Short Snout (Variant 1) causes snout shortening, and actually accounts for 36% of the variation seen in dog muzzle length. The variant is found in the SMOC2 gene.

Short Snout (Variant 2)

Short Snout (Variant 2) has been shown to cause shortening of the head and snout. The variant is found in the BMP3 gene.

Short Tail

The Short Tail variant is associated with a naturally short "bobbed" tail. The variant is located in the T-box gene.

Tan Points

The Tan Points variant is responsible for a distinct symmetrical pattern of tan and dark pigment, with tan markings on the eyebrow, cheeks, chest and lower legs. This variant is also required for a saddle tan pattern to occur.

Widow's Peak (Discovered in the Afghan Hound and Saluki)

The Widow's peak (Discovered in the Afghan Hound and Saluki) is also known as the Grizzle variant. It is responsible for a blended effect of light and dark hair, with the lower part of the body appearing lighter than the top. Other names for this variant include Eg and Domino, and it is found in the MC1R gene (known as the E locus), and is a rare trait.

Find the best DNA test for your pet. When it comes to the health and happiness of your dog, there’s always more to know. Wisdom Panel™ simplifies the science so you can care smarter. That’s why we’re the pet DNA service most used by veterinarians.