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Breed Education
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Magyar Agar
Magyar Agar

Magyar Agar

The Magyar Agár is a tough, fast sighthound with an endless supply of stamina. Though traditionally used for hunting, these dogs also make vigilant watchdogs and faithful companions.

Weight

0–0 kg

Height

-

Lifespan

– yr

Breed Group

Sighthound

Magyar Agar History

The Magyar Agár is an original hunting breed from Hungary. Experts believe the Magyars brought these dogs with them when they first settled the Carpathian Basin around the 9th century.

Though similar in appearance to the Greyhound, these dogs are a bit longer and stouter. As for their racing skills, the Magyar Agár has more endurance over longer distances. But it can't accelerate quite as fast as the Greyhound.

Breeders crossed the two in the 19th and 20th centuries to add more endurance to the Greyhound bloodline and rekindle dwindling stocks of Magyar Agár after World War II. The United Kennel Club recognized the breed in 2006.

Magyar Agar Traits

General Appearance

The Magyar Agár is an elegant sighthound with a strong bone structure and well-developed muscles.

Coat and Colouring

This breed's short coat is dense, coarse, and smooth. Magyar Agárs develop a thick undercoat in the winter that protects them from harsh weather.

These dogs come in all colors and combinations. But blue, blue and white, brown, wolf grey, black and tan, and tri-color are considered eliminating faults by breed standards.

Distinctive Physical Traits

The Magyar Agár has a wedge-shaped head, long muzzle, and elegant, muscular neck. The breed's dark eyes give an intelligent expression, and its rose ears are large and thick. These dogs also have a deep chest, well-arched ribs, tucked-up belly, and long, muscular legs.

Magyar Agar Temperament

Magyar Agárs are friendly dogs that make wonderful pets for people with active lifestyles. Though they can be a bit reserved, these pups usually get along great with other dogs and kids. Their loyal, protective nature also makes them excellent watchdogs.

This breed does require careful socialization to prevent or reduce defensive or fear-based behaviors. Experiencing a wide variety of people, places, and situations when they're young will help them grow into happy, well-mannered adult dogs.

These racing dogs were born to chase—and that instinct is likely to take over when they encounter small pets or wildlife. So, exercise caution when little critters are around.

Magyar Agar Care

Nutrition

Magyar Agárs need high-quality food appropriate for their life stage (e.g., puppy, adult, senior), breed size, and activity level.

Because of their deep chests, these dogs may be more prone to bloat (also known as twisted stomach). To help prevent this condition, break your dog's food up into several meals a day, and use a food bowl specially designed to slow their eating. When timing meals, avoid feeding your pup immediately before or after any vigorous activity.

These are just a few ways you can help prevent this life-threatening condition. Ask your veterinarian about other ways—including surgical options—to prevent bloat.

Grooming

This breed's short coat doesn't require much maintenance. For most of the year, weekly brushing will do the trick. In the winter—when Magyar Agárs have their dense undercoats—you may need to brush more frequently.

Trimming nails, cleaning ears, and brushing teeth should also be part of every dog's grooming routine, regardless of breed.

Exercise

Magyar Agárs do like to spend a large part of the day napping. But they are still active dogs that require plenty of exercise. Daily long, brisk walks and opportunities to run in a fenced yard or alongside a bike are ideal. This breed also seems to enjoy dog sports—such as lure coursing, racing, agility, and competitive obedience.

Training

Intelligent dogs that love to learn, Magyar Agárs are relatively easy to train—especially if you start basic obedience at a young age. For successful training sessions, stay positive and use reward-based methods.

Resources

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