Features of Mixed-breed Dogs

Mixed-breed dogs can be simple or complex. The more pure or mixed breeds in a dog’s ancestry, the more difficult it is to identify a dog’s pedigree.

The further back a given pedigree is in a dog’s history, the more mixed and diluted the characteristics in the genetic signature will be. Genetic signatures from purebred parents of a mixed-breed dog are easier to detect than grandparents, and both are much easier to detect than great-grandparents.

 

Looks Can Be Deceiving

These three dogs all have at least 50% Golden Retriever in their ancestry; however, they all look very different, and none of them look like a purebred Golden. Depending on what dominant traits and/or recessive traits a dog receives from its parents, the way it expresses the different breeds in its ancestry can vary greatly.

 

A range of possible body shapes and sizes can be seen in the appearance of mixed-breed dogs. Below are some of the more commonly seen ones.

Ear types

Chow_Chow
Labrador_Retriever
German_Shepherd_Dog
Airedale_Terrier

Tail styles

Chow_Chow
Labrador_Retriever
German_Shepherd_Dog
Airedale_Terrier

Muzzle shapes

Chow_Chow
Labrador_Retriever
German_Shepherd_Dog
Airedale_Terrier

Fun Fact

Physical features of certain breeds such as the flattened face of the Bulldog, or the extremely curled tail of the Pug, seldom survive even the first cross-breeding.